Archive for the ‘Europe’ Category

t1larg.africa.care A negative image of Africa in the UK is harming efforts to raise food aid in the continent, charity Oxfam has said.

It found that three out of four people had become desensitised to images showing hunger, drought and disease.

Three-quarters thought it was possible to end hunger in Africa, but just one in five believed they could play an active role in achieving it.

Of the more than 2,000 people (more…)

Supporters of Ghanaian opposition candidate Nana Akufo-Addo of the New Patriotic Party, in Kasoa, December 1, 2012.

Supporters of Ghanaian opposition candidate Nana Akufo-Addo of the New Patriotic Party, in Kasoa, December 1, 2012.

Unlike their Western counterparts, Africans take elections very seriously — rising up early to queue patiently in line for hours under the hot sun and cast their ballots. Any misguided attempt to nullify or steal their votes will evoke (more…)

Britain's Mohamed Farah celebrates winning the men's 5000m final at the Games on August 11Global press agency AFP have already released their selection of 2012’s best pictures — even though there is still a full month to go. The incredible images capture every major news story of the year so far, from triumph at the Olympics to the devastation caused by Hurricane Sandy in the US and ongoing violence in Syria.  (more…)

In our series of viewpoints from African journalists, London-based Ugandan writer Joel Kibazo considers how the leadership of the big superpowers affects the continent. Sometimes it is so difficult to know which way to turn.

I was among the millions that abandoned sleep last Tuesday to watch the spectacle that is the US presidential election draw to a close. This after all is the most powerful nation on earth and what happens in the United States affects every soul on the planet. How could I possibly go to sleep without knowing (more…)

Israeli warplanes have struck Gaza militants for a fifth straight day as its military prepared for a possible ground invasion, though Egypt saw ‘some indications’ of a truce ahead.

Forty-seven Palestinians, about half of them civilians, including 12 children, have been killed in Israel’s raids, Palestinian officials said. More than 500 rockets fired from Gaza have hit Israel, killing three people and injuring dozens. (more…)

He is the most badly burned survivor of the King’s Cross fire after his face melted away and his fingers fused together when he was hit by a 600C fireball.

But survivor Kwasi Afari Minta, a Ghanaian – whose face became the enduring image of the disaster – has said: ‘I feel lucky’.

The fire on November 18, 1987, killed 31 people and injured more than 60 others. The King’s Cross fire victim had to wear a medical mask to help skin grafts and treatment of his melted face after he was severely burnt

Bravery behind the mask: Kwasi Afari Minta, who was the most badly burned of the King’s Cross survivors, says he feels lucky

Hundreds were trapped underground as black smoke poured through the tunnels as panicking crowds, screaming in terror, hammered on trains which rushed past platforms without stopping.

Those that managed to survive from the furnace-like heat and smoke have since spoken of their horror 100ft below ground.

Kwasi was one of the survivors, but he has felt the pain ever since. (more…)

Cape Town — Gallup, a leading research consultancy known for its opinion polls, has released its “Global States of Mind: New Metrics for World Leaders” report, which seeks to provide leaders at all levels of society with “timely, foward-looking economics on what their citizens are thinking”.

It is crucial for a country’s leadership to be in touch with the mood of its citizens, according to Gallup CEO Jim Clifton, as highlighted by the events of the Arab Spring.

Here are some high- and lowlights from the report: (more…)

Helen Zille treads a narrow path. She’s a white woman, leading the main opposition party, against a former African liberation movement, in what you might call a “developing democracy”.

In many countries, the leader of the opposition can afford to rail and spin and generally throw mud at the ruling party without too much caution, while those in charge of running the government are held more firmly to account.

Here in South Africa the opposite often seems to hold true. (more…)

The world’s wealthy countries often criticise African nations for corruption – especially that perpetrated by those among the continent’s government and business leaders who abuse their positions by looting tens of billions of dollars in national assets or the profits from state-owned enterprises that could otherwise be used to relieve the plight of some of the world’s poorest peoples. (more…)