Posts Tagged ‘africa’

Supporters of Ghanaian opposition candidate Nana Akufo-Addo of the New Patriotic Party, in Kasoa, December 1, 2012.

Supporters of Ghanaian opposition candidate Nana Akufo-Addo of the New Patriotic Party, in Kasoa, December 1, 2012.

Unlike their Western counterparts, Africans take elections very seriously — rising up early to queue patiently in line for hours under the hot sun and cast their ballots. Any misguided attempt to nullify or steal their votes will evoke (more…)

Political violence soon took on an ethnic dimension after Kenya’s disputed 2007 elections. Africa’s democratic transition is back in the spotlight. The concern is no longer the stranglehold of autocrats, but the hijacking of the democratic process by tribal politics. Kenya’s 2007-08 post-election violence revealed the extent to which tribal forces could quickly bring a country to the brink of civil war.

The challenge to democracy in Africa is not the prevalence of ethnic diversity, but the use of identity politics to (more…)

The opposition New Patriotic Party (NPP) will sweep approximately 52 per cent of the total votes in the December 7 presidential polls, while its rival, the ruling National Democratic Congress (NDC) will get 46.9 per cent of the votes, a local research group, Marketing Social Research International (MSRI), has said.

The findings show that the other smaller parties would barely make one per cent of the collective votes.

The research was conducted between September and October 2012 across all the 230 constituencies in Ghana. (more…)

Cape Town — Gallup, a leading research consultancy known for its opinion polls, has released its “Global States of Mind: New Metrics for World Leaders” report, which seeks to provide leaders at all levels of society with “timely, foward-looking economics on what their citizens are thinking”.

It is crucial for a country’s leadership to be in touch with the mood of its citizens, according to Gallup CEO Jim Clifton, as highlighted by the events of the Arab Spring.

Here are some high- and lowlights from the report: (more…)

The world’s wealthy countries often criticise African nations for corruption – especially that perpetrated by those among the continent’s government and business leaders who abuse their positions by looting tens of billions of dollars in national assets or the profits from state-owned enterprises that could otherwise be used to relieve the plight of some of the world’s poorest peoples. (more…)

A generator that runs on urine,designed by three 14-year-old school girls, was on show. People from the tiniest African villages to some of its largest cities have converged on Lagos, Nigeria, this week to talk about making stuff.

The Maker movement – which encompasses traditional handicrafts through to cutting-edge robotics, is growing exponentially around (more…)

Some people on this continent expected more from the son of man who grew up herding goats in a village in western Kenya.

President Barack Obama made only one, cursory trip to sub-Saharan Africa during his first term, and at the time made it fairly clear that he would not be smothering the continent with attention.

“Africa’s future is up to Africans,” he said in Ghana, in a speech that quietly acknowledged the limitations of American influence in a region that now trades more with China than the US. (more…)

Africa’s economy may be booming, but this will do little to help unemployment and poverty if growth is jobless and its spoils are limited to the few.

“What we need in Africa is balanced development. Economic success cannot be a replacement for human rights or participation, or democracy … it (more…)

Nigeria’s militant Islamist group, Boko Haram, and the security forces have been accused by Amnesty International of committing widespread atrocities in the mainly Muslim north.

Boko Haram, whose name means “Western education is forbidden”, is fighting to overthrow the (more…)

NOT so long ago, South Africa was by far the most serious and economically successful country in Africa. At the turn of the millennium it accounted for 40% of the total GDP of the 48 countries south of the Sahara, whereas Nigeria, three times more populous, lurched along in second place with around 14%. The remainder, in raw economic terms, barely seemed to count. (more…)